September 23-25, 2008. MIT Campus

EmTech08 Speakers


Gwen Acton

 

Gwen Acton

CEO, Vivo Group; President, Women Entrepreneurs in Science and Technology (WEST)

Gwen Acton is president of Women Entrepreneurs in Science and Technology (WEST), a nonprofit organization that helps scientists develop innovative leadership techniques and enhance their professional and personal development. She is also CEO of Vivo Group, a strategic-consulting firm specializing in improving the productivity and innovation of scientists and other highly trained knowledge workers. Previously, Acton served as director of scientific development at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research.

Acton received a doctorate in biology from MIT and served on the faculty of Harvard University’s department of molecular and cellular biology.

 

David P. Anderson

 

David P. Anderson

Research Scientist, University of California, Berkeley

Dr. David Anderson received a PhD in computer science from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in 1985. He taught in the computer science department at the University of California, Berkeley ; worked at several startup companies; and then returned to Berkeley as a research scientist. His work focuses on “citizen cyber-science”—using the Internet to involve the global public in scientific research.

Anderson leads the BOINC project, which develops widely used middleware for volunteer computing, and he is also involved in creating new technology for distributed thinking and Web-based education.

 

Linda Avey

 

Linda Avey

Cofounder, 23andMe

Linda Avey has more than 20 years of sales and business development experience in the biopharmaceutical industry in San Francisco, Boston, San Diego, and Washington, D.C. Before starting 23andMe, she developed translational research collaborations with academic and pharmaceutical partners for Affymetrix and Perlegen Sciences. She also spent time at Spotfire, where she helped scientists understand the power of data visualization, and worked at Applied Biosystems during the early days of the Human Genome Project. The formation of 23andMe grew out of Avey's realization that insufficient funding for adequate studies was limiting the potential of high-density genome-wide scanning technologies. Her primary interest is the acceleration of personalized medicine, using genetic profiles to target the right drug to the right person at the correct dose.

Avey graduated from Augustana College with a BA in biology.

 

Theodore Betley

 

Theodore Betley

Assistant Professor, Harvard University

Theodore Betley was born on May 15, 1977, and grew up in Michigan. After receiving his BSE in chemical engineering from the University of Michigan in 1999, he joined the labs of Jonas Peters at Caltech. In 2005 he completed his PhD work on the reaction chemistry of low-valent Fe relevant to dinitrogen activation. Thereafter he moved to MIT to study with Daniel Nocera, focusing on the synthesis of late-transition metal, high-valent oxo complexes in the context of chemical energy conversion. In 2007, he joined the chemistry and chemical-biology department at Harvard University.

 

Gina Bianchini

 

Gina Bianchini

Cofounder and CEO, Ning

Gina Bianchini is the cofounder and CEO of Ning, a social-networking service with a twist: it empowers people to create their own social websites and social networks. Previously, she was cofounder and president of Harmonic Communications, which was acquired by Dentsu. She has also held positions at CKS Group and Goldman Sachs.

Bianchini holds a BA from Stanford University and an MBA from Stanford Business School.

 

Eric Bonabeau

 

Eric Bonabeau

CEO, Icosystem

Eric Bonabeau is the CEO of Icosystem, a technology and services firm based in Cambridge, MA, that focuses on predictive analytics for marketing, decision support, and discovery. Before founding Icosystem in 2000, Bonabeau was an R&D engineer with France Telecom (1990–1996), the Interval Research Fellow at the Santa Fe Institute (1996–1999), and the CEO of consulting firm Eurobios (1999–2000). The author of two books (Swarm Intelligence, Oxford University Press; Self-Organization in Biological Systems, Princeton University Press) and numerous articles, he received engineering degrees from École Polytechnique and Telecom Paris and a PhD in theoretical physics from Paris-Orsay University.

 

Rick Borovoy

 

Rick Borovoy

CTO, nTAG Interactive

Rick Borovoy is a pioneer in social networking and collaborative learning. At MIT’s Media Lab, Borovoy researched the causes of dissatisfaction with business communications and networking events. This led to the development of the world's first interactive name badge specifically designed for face-to-face events, and to five patents in the field of collaborative technology. In 2002 he founded nTAG Interactive, now a premier provider of event technology solutions. Its products have improved results for companies such as IBM, J. P. Morgan Chase, Pfizer, P&G, and Intel.

Borovoy continues to analyze meetings and events, and posts new findings and analysis in his blog: rick.ntag.com.

 

Debra Bowen

 

Debra Bowen

California Secretary of State

Debra Bowen, a pioneer in open-government reform, election integrity, and personal privacy rights, became the sixth woman in California history elected to a statewide constitutional office when she was elected secretary of state in November 2006. Bowen is responsible for overseeing state and federal elections, a role that requires her to test and certify all voting equipment. Her goal is to ensure that voting machines certified for use in California elections are secure, accurate, reliable, and accessible and that every voter’s ballot is counted exactly as it was cast. Bowen is also charged with managing many business filings, campaign finance and lobbying activity filings, the state archives, and other key government services.

An attorney, Bowen most recently served 14 years as a lawmaker in the state assembly and senate. She authored landmark consumer protection laws to prevent identity theft, as well as the first-in-the-world law that put all of California’s legislative information online.

 

Candida G. Brush

 

Candida G. Brush

Division Chair in Entrepreneurship, Babson College

Candida G. Brush holds the Paul T. Babson Chair in Entrepreneurship at Babson College and is a visiting adjunct professor at the Norwegian School of Engineering and Technology in Trondheim, Norway. She is also a founding member of the Diana Project International and received the 2007 FSF NUTEK Award for outstanding contributions to entrepreneurship research. Her research investigates women's growth businesses and resource acquisition strategies in emerging ventures. She is the author of 100 publications, serves on the board of several emerging ventures, and is an editor for Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice.

 

Michele Cargill

 

Michele Cargill

Director of Human Genetics, Navigenics

Michele Cargill has more than a decade of experience as a human geneticist in both industry and academia, with a primary interest in discovering the genes that contribute to human disease and applying that knowledge in the field. Cargill trained under the tutelage of David Botstein at Stanford Medical School, where she earned her PhD in genetics, and Eric Lander at the Whitehead Institute, where she did her postdoctoral training. She has spent time at Affymetrix, Celera Diagnostics, and Celera Genomics, where she managed a variety of genomic and genetic projects. She holds 17 U.S. and worldwide patents and patent applications.

 

 

Doug Chapin

 

Doug Chapin

Director, Electionline.org

Doug Chapin directs the Pew Center on the States’ Electionline.org,overseeing its clearinghouse function for election administration news and reform, including a website, a weekly e-newsletter, and reports and briefings on election administration issues. Electionline.org collaborates closely with the Center on the States’ Make Voting Work project to support, translate, and disseminate relevant research to the elections field.

Chapin holds a law degree from Georgetown University Law Center, a master’s in public administration from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, and a bachelor’s in politics from Princeton University. He also teaches election administration at American University and Georgetown University Law Center.

 

Craig Chapman

 

Craig Chapman

Cofounder and CTO, Inrix

Craig Chapman is an accomplished development engineer and architect with 30 years’ experience developing advanced software systems and managing teams of software and hardware engineers. Before cofounding Inrix, Chapman was an executive at Microsoft, serving as development manager for the Automotive Business Unit and in other technical roles in the Consumer Productivity Business Unit and Microsoft Consulting Services. He was previously a director of software development at Span Instruments, a principal engineer at AST Computers, and a senior systems analyst for Burroughs. He holds a BA in mathematics from Occidental College.

 

Robin Chase

 

Robin Chase

Founder and CEO, GoLoco

Robin Chase is founder and CEO of GoLoco, an online ride-sharing community; she previously founded and served as CEO of Zipcar, the largest car-sharing company in the world. She also founded and leads Meadow Networks, a consulting firm that advises city, state, and federal government agencies about wireless applications in the transportation sector and their impact on innovation and economic development.

Chase lectures widely, has been featured frequently in the media, and has received many awards in the areas of innovation, design, and environment. She graduated from Wellesley College and MIT’s Sloan School of Management, and she was a Harvard University Loeb Fellow.

 

Jennifer Chayes

 

Jennifer Chayes

Managing Director, Microsoft Research New England

Jennifer Chayes’s research areas include phase transitions in discrete mathematics and computer science, structural and dynamical properties of self-engineered networks, and algorithmic game theory. She is the coauthor of more than 100 scientific papers and more than 20 patents.

 Chayes serves on numerous institute boards, advisory committees, and editorial boards, including the Turing Award Committee. She received her PhD at Princeton and held postdoctoral fellowships at Harvard and Cornell. She is the recipient of the NSF Postdoctoral Fellowship, the Sloan Fellowship, and the UCLA Distinguished Teaching Award. Chayes is also a fellow of the AAAS and the Fields Institute and a national associate of the National Academies.

 

Ryan Chin

 

Ryan Chin

PhD Candidate, MIT Media Lab

Ryan Chin is a fourth-year PhD student in the Smart Cities research group at the MIT Media Laboratory. He is building the car of the future, the CityCar—a foldable, stackable, sharable, two-passenger electric vehicle. The project, a collaboration with General Motors, tackles the problems of parking, congestion, energy efficiency, and carbon emissions in cities. In 2007, Chin led a team of Media Lab students in creating the RoboScooter, a lightweight electric folding scooter designed as a clean, green mobility solution also for cities. Both projects are exploration platforms for urban design, mass customization, and technological innovation.

 

Tanzeem Choudhury

 

Tanzeem Choudhury

Assistant Professor, Dartmouth College

Tanzeem Choudhury is in the computer-science department at Dartmouth College, which she joined in 2008 after four years at Intel Research Seattle. Her research involves developing machine-learning techniques for systems that can reason about human activities, interactions, and social networks in everyday environments. Choudhury’s doctoral thesis demonstrated the feasibility of using wearable sensors to capture and model social networks automatically, on the basis of face-to-face conversations. She received her PhD from the Media Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

 

George Church

 

George Church

Professor of Genetics and Director of the Center for Computational Genetics, Harvard Medical School

George Church helped develop the first direct genomic sequencing method in the course of research for his PhD in biochemistry and molecular biology with Walter Gilbert at Harvard University in 1984. As a research scientist at Biogen and a Monsanto Life Sciences Research Fellow at UCSF, he helped initiate the Human Genome Project the same year.

Church invented the broadly applied concepts of molecular multiplexing and tags, homologous recombination methods, and array DNA synthesizers. Technology transfer of automated sequencing and software to Genome Therapeutics resulted in the first commercial genome sequence (of the human pathogen H. pylori) in 1994. His current research focuses on integrating biosystems modeling with personal genomics and synthetic biology.

 

Robert X. Cringely

 

Robert X. Cringely

Writer, Broadcaster, and Computer Guy

Robert Cringely writes a weekly technology column for PBS. His work has also appeared inthe New York Times, Newsweek, Forbes, Upside, Success, Worth, and many other publications. His 1992 national best-seller Accidental Empires: How the Boys of Silicon Valley Make Their Millions, Battle Foreign Competition, and Still Can’t Get a Date became the basis for Triumph of the Nerds, a three-hour miniseries seen in more than 50 countries. A dozen more technology shows followed, the latest being The Transformation Age: Surviving a Technological Revolution. Cringely’s name was once the answer to a question on Jeopardy.

 

Robert M. Day

 

Robert M. Day

Principal, @Ventures

Rob Day is a principal with @Ventures, an early-stage clean-tech venture capital firm. He also observes on the boards of Powerit Holdings and M2E Power. Before joining @Ventures, he was an investor with Expansion Capital Partners. Earlier in his career, he worked at Bain, and he was also a founding member of the World Resources Institute’s Sustainable Enterprise Program.

Day is the coauthor of The Next Bottom Line: Making Sustainable Development Tangible. He is president of the Renewable Energy Business Network and a member of the advisory boards of the New England Clean Energy Council and GreenTech Media. He also authors a website on clean-tech investing, which appears on GreenTechMedia.com.

 

Diane Darling

 

Diane Darling

Founder and CEO, Effective Networking

Diane Darling founded Effective Networking on the premise that everyone can learn to network; you just need to find your own style. Darling is the author of The Networking Survival Guide, published in 2003, and Networking for Career Success, published in 2005; the books have been translated into Portuguese, Thai, Korean, Chinese, Indonesian, and Japanese. She has appeared on the NBC Nightly News and in the Wall Street Journal, the San Francisco Chronicle, and the Boston Globe. Her travels have encompassed all seven continents and approximately 60 countries. She has lived in various parts of the U.S. and the Far East.

 

Gururaj “Desh” Deshpande

 

Gururaj “Desh” Deshpande

Chairman, Sycamore Networks, A123 Systems, and Tejas Networks

Gururaj “Desh” Deshpande is co-founder and chairman of Sycamore Networks, a market leader in intelligent optical networking. Prior to Sycamore, Dr. Deshpande was founder and chairman of Cascade Communications, a data networking company that was sold for $3.7 billion in June 1997. Deshpande serves as a member of the MIT Corporation, and his generous donations have made possible MIT's Deshpande Center for Technological Innovation. Dr. Deshpande also currently serves on the board of directors of Airvana, Inc., A123 Systems, and Tejas Networks. Dr. Deshpande holds a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, M.E. in Electrical Engineering from the University of New Brunswick in Canada, and Ph.D. in Data Communications from Queens University in Canada.

 

Jennifer Elisseeff

 

Jennifer Elisseeff

Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University

Jennifer Elisseeff, an associate professor of biomedical engineering and orthopedic surgery at Johns Hopkins, received a BS from Carnegie Mellon University and a PhD in medical engineering from the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology. Elisseeff cofounded Cartilix and serves on the scientific advisory boards of Bausch and Lomb, Kythera Biopharmaceuticals, and Cellular Bioengineering. She has received the Carnegie Mellon Young Alumni Award, among other honors, and has been named a top innovator by Technology Review. In 2008, she was elected a fellow in the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering and a Young Global Leader at the World Economic Forum.

 

Dan Farber

 

Dan Farber

Editor in Chief, CNET News

Dan Farber has more than 25 years of experience as an editor and journalist covering technology. Before coming to CNET News, part of CNET Networks, he was editor in chief of ZDNet, where led the development of its worldwide network of technology-focused sites. Farber also served as vice president and editor-in-chief at Ziff-Davis's flagship computing news publications, PC Week and MacWeek, and was a founding editor at MacWorld. He is based in San Francisco.

 

Susan Foley

 

Susan Foley

Executive Director, Research Centers at Babson Executive Education; Founder, Corporate Entrepreneurs

Susan Foley is responsible for the Working Knowledge, Process Management, and Innovation Research Centers at Babson Executive Education. The Research Centers are a sponsor-driven group of organizations interested in advancing their knowledge and the application of “best practices.” Foley is also the founder of Corporate Entrepreneurs, a firm that helps organizations build new growth businesses. She is the author of numerous articles and the book Entrepreneurs Inside: Accelerating Business Growth with Corporate Entrepreneurs, which is based on research conducted with a group of experienced corporate entrepreneurs across a diverse set of industries. She has held senior positions at Standard and Poor’s, 3M, Hewlett-Packard, Digital Equipment, DMR Group (now Fujitsu), and Arthur D. Little.

 

Ric Fulop

 

Ric Fulop

Founder and VP of Marketing and Business Development, A123Systems

Ric Fulop cofounded A123Systems in 2001 to commercialize novel technology developed at MIT’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering. One of his greater goals for A123Systems is to help promote clean energy technologies that can improve the world’s carbon cycle by providing compelling energy storage solutions for transportation and electric-grid services. His experience in entrepreneurship includes founding six technology companies that have raised more than $370 million, in industries as varied as energy storage, software, semiconductors, and wireless communications. Fulop has an MBA from the MIT Sloan School of Management, where he was a Sloan Fellow.

 

Anwar Ghuloum

 

Anwar Ghuloum

Principal Engineer, Intel

Anwar Ghuloum works with Intel’s Microprocessor Technology Lab on such diverse topics as parallel language and compiler design, parallel architecture evaluation, optimizing memory system performance, and multimedia applications. Ghuloum earned a BS in computer science and engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles, and a PhD in computer science from Carnegie Mellon. Before joining Intel, he cofounded and was the CTO of a fabless semiconductor startup called Intensys. Earlier, at a biotech startup called MetaXen (acquired by Exelexis Pharmaceuticals), he developed novel predictive drug-design software for early lead optimization using 3-D surface pattern recognition techniques.

 

Madeline Glick

 

Madeleine Glick

Principal Research Scientist, Intel Research

Madeleine Glick leads the optical-systems work at Intel Research Pittsburgh. Her interests include signal processing, coding, and switching for high-bandwidth optical interconnects. Glick has published more than 100 articles and is a fellow of the Institute of Physics, a member of the U.K. EPSRC Peer Review College, an associate editor of the Journal of Optical Networking, and a member of the editorial advisory board of Optics and Photonics News. She received a PhD in physics from Columbia University and is an adjunct professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University.

 

Matthew Gllotzbach

 

Matthew Glotzbach

Product Management Director, Google

Matthew Glotzbach is responsible for the development, management, and marketing of the Google Enterprise product lines. He brings 10 years of enterprise product management, marketing, and sales experience to the team, specializing in the business and technology needs of enterprise customers. Before joining Google, Glotzbach was a senior member of the management team for the Computer Industry Business Unit at Trilogy, a software company based in Austin, TX. He was involved with the creation of Trilogy’s product direction and acted as the lead product manager on a number of Trilogy’s industry solutions. Glotzbach holds a bachelor’s degree from Cornell University.

 

John D. Halamka

 

John D. Halamka

Chief Information Officer, CareGroup Health System; Chief Information Officer and Dean for Technology, Harvard Medical School 

As chief information officer at CareGroup, John Halamka is responsible for all clinical, financial, administrative, and academic information technology serving 3,000 doctors, 14,000 employees, and two million patients. As chief information officer and dean for technology at Harvard Medical School, he oversees all educational, research, and administrative computing for 18,000 faculty members and 3,000 students. As chairman of the New England Health Electronic Data Interchange Network (NEHEN), he oversees the administrative data exchange in Massachusetts. As CEO of MA-SHARE, he oversees the state's clinical data exchange efforts. As chair of the U.S. Healthcare Information Technology Standards Panel (HITSP), he coordinates the process of electronic standards harmonization among stakeholders nationwide.

Paula T. Hammond

 

Paula T. Hammond

Bayer Chair Professor and Executive Officer in the Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Paula T. Hammond earned her SB in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1984, her MS from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1988, and her PhD in chemical engineering from MIT in 1993. Hammond’s research and educational program emphasizes the use of molecular aspects in the study and development of new materials and processes.

 

Parker Harris

 

Parker Harris

Executive Vice President of Technology, Salesforce.com

Parker Harris founded Salesforce.com with Marc Benioff, Dave Moellenhoff, and Frank Dominguez in the spring of 1999. As executive vice president, Harris oversees the development of all software for the company.

Previously, Harris developed his expertise in Web applications and sales force automation at Left Coast Software, a private consulting company he cofounded, and at Metropolis Software, an early pioneer in field sales force automation subsequently acquired by Clarify.

Harris has more than 12 years of experience in software engineering and management. He graduated from Middlebury College with a bachelor's degree in English literature.

 

Konrad Hochedlinger

 

Konrad Hochedlinger

Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School

Konrad Hochedlinger received his BS in biology and his PhD in genetics from the University of Vienna. He worked from 1998 to 1999 with Erwin Wagner at the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology in Vienna, and from 2000 to 2006 as a visiting graduate student and postdoc with Rudolf Jaenisch at the Whitehead Institute at MIT before starting his own lab at Harvard University in 2006. Hochedlinger’s research goals are to understand the molecular mechanisms of stem-cell self-renewal and pluripotency during normal development and in disease. Hochedlinger is a Kimmel and V Scholar and was awarded the NIH Director’s Innovator Award in 2007.

 

Jo Hoppe

 

Jo Hoppe

VP and CIO, Pegasystems

Jo Hoppe is an experienced executive with a broad range of IT, SW development, and operations roles. Currently, she serves as CIO of Pegasystems, the market-leading BPM company. Previously, she worked at CMGI, a $1.2 billion Internet company, where she held the dual role of EVP/CIO; and at uBID, a $750 million online auction business, where she was CTO. She has held CIO positions at Addison Wesley and Houghton Mifflin and spent 12 years at Atex, where she ran a $60 million software P&L. Hoppe is president of the Boston board of SIM and has been featured in CIO magazine, Upside magazine, Mass High Tech, the Boston Women’s Journal, ComputerWorld, and the Seybold Report.

 

Eric Horvitz

 

Eric Horvitz

Principal Researcher and Research Area Manager, Microsoft Research

Eric Horvitz leads Microsoft teams doing R&D in machine learning and decision making, search, human-computer interaction, e-commerce, computational theory, and cryptography. He is president of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) and an associate editor of the Journal of the ACM, and he has served on the DARPA Information Science and Technology Study Group (ISAT), the Naval Research Advisory Committee (NRAC), and the CMU Machine Learning Advisory Board. He received his PhD and MD degrees at Stanford University.

 

Kristina Isakovich

Kristina Isakovich

Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer, Philips Healthcare

Kristina Isakovich is responsible for strengthening the leadership position of Philips Healthcare by developing, driving, and executing successful commercialization, branding, and go-to-market strategies for this $11 billion global leader in diagnostic imaging systems, health-care information technology solutions, patient-monitoring and cardiac devices, and home health-care solutions. She is leading the transition from a product- and technology-driven organization to a more market-driven organization.   

Previously, Isakovich was the VP of marketing at Fisher Scientific International, VP for corporate strategy at Thermo Electron, and a senior engagement manager at McKinsey. She received her PhD in nuclear physics from MIT and a BS in physics and math from Yale University.

 

Priya Iyer

 

Priya Iyer

President, Anaqua

Priya Iyer joined Anaqua as COO in 2005 and was promoted to president in 2007. She has more than 17 years of experience in the software industry; before coming to Anaqua, she was head of operations at Steelpoint Technologies, where she drove the company from the red to profitable quarter-after-quarter growth, and managing partner at Agency.com, where she founded a financial-services practice that grew to $150 million in less than five years. She has also held senior positions at Bell Labs and Foxboro Systems.

Iyer holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in computer science and an MBA from the MIT Sloan School of Management. She serves on several boards and executive panels and is a regular guest speaker at Sloan.

 

Rosana Kapeller

 

Rosana Kapeller

VP of Research, Aileron Therapeutics

Before joining Aileron, a company that is applying its proprietary “stapled peptide” technology to create breakthrough drugs for the treatment of cancer and other diseases, Rosanna Kapeller held positions of increasing responsibility at Millennium Pharmaceuticals, most recently serving as director of the department of molecular and cellular biology. She completed her postdoctoral fellowship at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and was named a David Abraham Fellow in pediatric oncology in 1996. Kapeller received her PhD at Tufts University Medical School and her MD at the Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas da Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro.

 

Jeff Kash

 

Jeff Kash

Manager, Optical Link and Systems Design, IBM Research

Jeff Kash joined IBM Research in 1981, initially studying femtosecond electron and exciton dynamics in semiconductors. In 1995, he coinvented picosecond imaging circuit analysis, which is used today to debug advanced CMOS ICs. Since 2000, Kash has been manager of the Optical Link and Systems Design group. He directs DARPA-sponsored IBM programs for chip-to-chip optical interconnects and nanophotonic optical switches. He also has responsibility for optical interconnects in next- and future-generation supercomputers.  Kash has published more than 140 papers in major technical journals and holds 21 patents. He is a fellow of both the APS and the IEEE.

 

Zoë Keating

 

Zoë Keating

Avant Cellist

Avant cellist Zoë Keating is like a one-woman string orchestra. Using her cello, a computer and a foot pedal, she records layer upon layer of cello, manipulating the live arrangement with her feet. The result is a dramatic, emotional, sweeping epic of sound and has been featured on NPR, PBS and the BBC. Her self-produced album, recorded onto a laptop in her warehouse studio, made it to #2 in the iTunes charts.  

Zoë was a longtime member of the infamous cello-rock group Rasputina. She has recorded and performed with countless artists, including DJ Shadow, Amanda Palmer of the Dresden Dolls and Imogen Heap.

 

James Kim

 

James Kim

Senior Partner, CMEA Ventures

Jim Kim joined CMEA Ventures in 2007 as a partner. Previously, he was a vice president at GE Commercial Finance, where he led technology venture investments in clean tech, advanced materials, and digital media. Kim helped found the Energy Technology Ventures group at GE Energy Financial Services, where he also worked on domestic and foreign structured finance opportunities in renewable energy. Earlier in his career, he was an analyst with GCI Partners in Boston, an early-stage IT venture capital consulting firm.

Kim holds a BS from MIT in computer science and electrical engineering, another in political science, and an MBA and master's in quantitative methods from Columbia University. He continues to work as a research assistant on projects with Columbia Medical Center and the Earth Institute.

 

Robert M. Kolodner

 

Robert M. Kolodner

National Coördinator for Health Information Technology, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Robert M. Kolodner, who was appointed national coördinator for health information technology in April 2007, leads the Office of the National Coördinator in making steady progress toward advancing the president’s health IT initiative. Since 1997, he has served in several health IT leadership positions in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, overseeing, promoting, and guiding VA activities related to the establishment of a lifelong, comprehensive, computerized clinical record for military personnel and our nation’s veterans. Kolodner received his undergraduate degree from Harvard College and his medical degree from the Yale University School of Medicine.

 

Steven E. Koonin

 

Steven E. Koonin

Chief Scientist, BP

Steven E. Koonin is the chief scientist of BP, the world's second-largest independent oil company. Koonin is responsible for BP's long-range technology plans and activities, particularly those “beyond petroleum.” He also has purview over BP's major university research programs around the world and provides technical advice to the company's senior executives. In 1975, he joined the faculty of Caltech, where he became a full professor in 1981 and served as provost from 1995 to 2004.

He has served on numerous advisory bodies for the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the Department of Energy. His research interests have included theoretical nuclear, many-body, and computational physics; nuclear astrophysics; and global environmental science. Koonin received his BS in physics at Caltech and his PhD in theoretical physics from MIT.

 

Ashok V. Krishnamoorthy

 

Ashok V. Krishnamoorthy

Distinguished Engineer, Sun Microsystems

Ashok V. Krishnamoorthy works with the Sun Microsystems Microelectronics Physical Sciences Center and is principal investigator for Sun’s photonics R&D. Previously, he was president and CTO of AraLight, was in residence at Lucent’s New Venture Group, and served on the technical staff in the Advance Photonics Research Department of Bell Labs. Krishnamoorthy has written more than 150 technical publications, holds 40 patents, serves on the technical advisory boards of several optical technology startups, and is an IEEE LEOS distinguished lecturer. He has won several awards, including the 2004 ICO International Prize in Optics and the 2006 Sun Microsystems Chairman’s Award.

 

Dawna S. Levenson

 

Dawna S. Levenson

Associate Director of Academic Programs, MIT Professional Education Programs

Within MIT’s Professional Education Programs (PEP), Dawna S. Levenson manages the Advanced Study Program (ASP), the Midcareer Acceleration Program (MAP), and a custom program with Accenture. Levenson, who earned a bachelor of science from MIT in 1983 and a master of science in management science in 1984, previously spent 18 years at Accenture, formerly Andersen Consulting, in its gas and electric utilities practice.

 

Charles E. Leiserson

 

Charles E. Leiserson

Professor and MacVicar Faculty Fellow, MIT; Founder, Cilk Arts

Charles E. Leiserson is a professor of computer science and engineering at MIT. His contributions include systolic architectures, the fat-tree interconnection network, the Cilk multithreaded programming language, and cache-oblivious algorithms. Introduction to Algorithms, the textbook he coauthored, is the most cited reference in computer science, according to CiteSeerX. He was network architect for the Connection Machine Model CM-5 supercomputer and led the engineering team that developed a worldwide content-distribution network at Akamai Technologies. He is also founder of Cilk Arts, which provides software to make it easy to program multicore computers.

 

Susan Lindquist

 

Susan Lindquist

Member, Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research; Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; Professor of Biology, MIT

Susan Lindquist, an expert in the biology of protein folding, is a member and former director of the Whitehead Institute, an MIT biology professor, and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. She received her PhD from Harvard University and was a professor of molecular biology at the University of Chicago from 1977 to 2001. She was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1997 and to the Institute of Medicine in 2006. She was named one of Scientific American 's top 50 research, business, and policy leaders for 2006, received the 2007 Nevada Medal for Scientific Achievement, and was named one of the “Harvard 100: Most Influential Alumni” for 2007 by 02138 magazine.

 

Bob Lozano

 

Bob Lozano

Founder and Chief Strategist, Appistry

Bob Lozano is a technology industry veteran, a serial entrepreneur, and a cofounder of Appistry, the company pioneering application fabric software. Lozano serves as chief strategist and was the founding CEO. He previously founded and led PaylinX, a pioneer and leader in ecommerce payments (acquired by CyberSource in 2000). Before that, he founded several other companies and held positions with SBC (AT&T), Monsanto, Sandia National Laboratories, and Intelligent Computer Systems. Lozano holds a BSEE from the University of Missouri and an MSEE from Stanford, and he has lectured on artificial intelligence at Washington University in St. Louis.

 

Kevin Lynch

 

Kevin Lynch

Chief Technology Officer and Senior Vice President, Experience & Technology Group, Adobe Systems Incorporated

As chief technology officer and senior vice president, Experience & Technology Group, Kevin Lynch oversees Adobe's experience design and core technology across business units.  This role includes driving Adobe's technology platform for designers and developers, including Adobe® Flash® Player, Portable Document Format (PDF), Adobe Flex® and Adobe AIR™, the cross-operating system application runtime that bridges the computing power and data capabilities of the desktop with the real-time dynamic capabilities of the web.  He also oversees Adobe's developer relations program, including the integration of customers and partners in the development process through Adobe Labs and customer advisory councils.

 

Masaaki Maeda

 

Masaaki Maeda

President and CEO, NTT DoCoMo USA

Masaaki Maeda is president and CEO of NTT DoCoMo USA, a wholly owned subsidiary of NTT DoCoMo, Japan’s leading mobile-telecommunications company. Mr. Maeda began his career in the Japanese telecommunications industry in the technical-development department of NTT (Nippon Telegraph and Telephone). In 1994, he moved to NTT DoCoMo, and in 2004 he launched NTT DoCoMo USA’s “Namikiteru” service in North America; the software application allows users to read and write Japanese and displays simplified and traditional Chinese, Hangul (Korean), and Japanese characters on BlackBerry handheld devices. This innovation has contributed tremendously to the global mobility of bilingual businesspeople.

Maeda holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in electrical engineering from the Tokyo Institute of Technology. In addition, he earned an MBA at MIT’s Sloan School of Management in June 2002.

 

Rich Miner

 

Rich Miner

Group Manager, Mobile Platforms, Google

Rich Miner has been developing innovative communications and interface-intensive applications for more than 20 years.  He is currently group manager of mobile platforms for Google, helping to build the Android platform. He has been with Google since the company acquired Android, a mobile software platforms company he cofounded. 

Previously, Miner was vice president of advanced services at Orange. He came to Orange through the acquisition of another company he cofounded, Wildfire, which made a voice-based personal assistant product that was sold to fixed and wireless carriers. He held various positions at Wildfire, including CTO and MD for Europe. He received his PhD in computer science from the University of Massachusetts at Lowell.

 

Dave Morin

 

Dave Morin

Senior Platform Manager, Facebook

At Facebook, Dave Morin is responsible for platform strategy and further expanding the Facebook developer community. Morin joined Facebook from Apple, where he became the manger of creation and collaboration technologies after his tenure as manager of student marketing. Before coming to Apple, Dave founded Viadi, a technology and marketing company focused on building strong brand experiences using the power of the Internet. Dave received a bachelor’s degree in economics and business from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

 

Meredith Ringel Morris

 

Meredith Ringel Morris

Researcher, Adaptive Systems and Interaction Group, Microsoft Research

Meredith Ringel Morris is a researcher in the Adaptive Systems and Interaction Group at Microsoft Research and one of this year’s TR35. She is also an affiliate assistant professor of computer science and engineering at the University of Washington. Morris’s main research areas are human-computer interaction and computer-supported coöperative work. Her current research focus is on developing and evaluating systems that support collaborative Web search. She earned her SB in computer science from Brown University and her MS and PhD in computer science from Stanford University, where her dissertation introduced interaction techniques for supporting coöperative work around tabletop displays.

 

Craig Mundie

 

Craig Mundie

Chief Research and Strategy Officer, Microsoft

Craig Mundie is a 15-year veteran of Microsoft Corporation, currently serving as Chief Research and Strategy Officer. He is one of two senior Microsoft executives chosen to take over the company's technical leadership when Gates retires from his day-to-day role in July 2008.

Craig's primary focus is on charting Microsoft's 3-10 year horizon—the long-cycle research, innovation and business incubations that will impact the future of technology. He frequently meets with global leaders in government, industry and academia to help shape how computing can positively impact fields such as healthcare, scientific research and education.

Craig's early career contributions at Microsoft included driving the development of non-PC platforms such as the Windows CE operating system; software for the handheld, Pocket and Auto PCs; and early console-gaming products.  He championed the Trustworthy Computing initiative, which has significantly improved security of Microsoft's products.  Before joining Microsoft, Craig was one of three co-founders of Alliant Computer Systems, which developed vector-parallel mini-supercomputers.

 

 

Girish Kumar Navani

CEO and Cofounder, eClinicalWorks

Girish Kumar Navani oversees the strategic direction of eClinicalWorks, a market leader in ambulatory clinical systems, and leads efforts to expand all aspects of the business. Navani also actively manages the development and product road map for eClinicalWorks solutions. Before founding eClinicalWorks, Navani led successful IT and business initiatives at Fidelity Investments, Teradyne, and Aspen Technology.

In recognition of his achievements, Navani was named to Boston Business Journal’s 2006 “40 under 40” list of entrepreneurs and innovators. He holds an MS in engineering from Boston University.

 

Rebecca Parsons

 

Rebecca Parsons

Chief Technology Officer, ThoughtWorks

Rebecca Parsons has more than 20 years’ experience in application development and computer science research, including the creation of large-scale distributed object applications and the integration of disparate systems. Before coming to ThoughtWorks she worked as an assistant professor of computer science at the University of Central Florida. She also worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Parsons received a bachelor of science degree in computer science and economics from Bradley University, a master of science in computer science from Rice University, and a PhD in computer science from Rice University.

 

Claudia Perlich

 

Claudia Perlich

Research Staff Member, IBM T. J. Watson Research Center

Claudia Perlich received her PhD in information systems from New York University’s Stern School of Business and also holds degrees in computer science. Her dissertation on multirelational machine learning was recognized as a winner of the International SAP Doctoral Support Award Competition. She is the author of more than 30 scientific publications and multiple patents in the area of machine learning, and she has won or placed second in various data-mining competitions (KDD Cup 2003, 2007, 2008 and ILP Challenge 2005). Perlich joined the Data Analytics Research group at the IBM T. J. Watson Research Lab in 2004. Her main research interest is data analytics and machine learning for complex real-world domains and applications.

 

Jules Pieri

 

Jules Pieri

CEO, Daily Grommet

Jules Pieri is CEO of Daily Grommet, an upcoming product discovery channel for social media. She was previously president and COO of Ziggs.com, a social-networking site for professionals.

Pieri has been building consumer brands and developing innovative products for more than 20 years. She held an operating-team position at Stride Rite and was director of strategic marketing and licensing at Keds. She also worked with Playskool as a product strategy expert and was a vice president at Design Continuum, a leading international product-design and engineering consultancy. She lived in Ireland from 2001 to 2005, consulting to major Irish brands.

 

Val Rahmani

 

Val Rahmani

General Manager, Internet Security Systems, IBM Global Technology Services

Val Rahmani is responsible for the strategic direction, growth, and integration of ISS products, services, and research into IBM’s overall security offerings. She assumed her current position in February 2008 and has managed diverse areas of IBM’s business, from developing the company’s overall strategy, with an emphasis on sales and distribution and services units, to running IBM’s UNIX business and its fast-growing wireless and mobile initiatives.

Rahmani holds a doctorate in chemistry from the University of Oxford in England.

 

Patricia Randall

 

Patricia Randall

Account Director, Kforce Technology Staffing

Patricia Randall has been an account director in the IT contract division of Kforce Technology Staffing for more than 11 years, and has been responsible for management of Kforce’s relationship with many large national and local clients. With more than 23 years’ experience in the IT staffing industry in the Boston area, Randall is known for her networking skills and enjoys connecting with people. For more than 10 years, she has been a member of the Society for Information Management (SIM), where she has served as president of the Boston chapter and is currently a trustee on the board of directors. She chairs Boston SIM’s Future Potential in IT effort, which is aimed at encouraging the current generation of college students to consider careers in information technology. She has also served on the board of SIM International for the past three years.

 

David Recordon

 

David Recordon

Open Platforms Tech Lead, Six Apart

David Recordon has played a pivotal role in developing and popularizing key social-media technologies such as OpenID. In 2005, he collaborated with Brad Fitzpatrick in developing OpenID, which has since become the most popular decentralized single-sign-on protocol in the history of the Web. During a year and a half at VeriSign, Recordon played an active role in refining and evangelizing OpenID, bringing it from an experimental technology to one that's been endorsed by everyone from open-source hackers to major companies around the world. Recordon was recently recognized by Google and O'Reilly as the recipient of a 2007 Open Source Award for his efforts with OpenID; he is the youngest recipient in the history of the award.

 

Dan Reed

 

Dan Reed

Scalable and Multicore Computing Strategist, Microsoft

As Microsoft’s Scalable and Multicore Computing Strategist, Dan Reed is responsible for re-envisioning the data center of the future. Reed is a member of President Bush’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology and a former member of the President’s Information Technology Advisory Committee. He is chair of the board of directors of the Computing Research Association and has also been director of the National Center for Supercomputing Applications. In addition, he was a principal investigator and chief architect for the NSF TeraGrid. He received his PhD in computer science from Purdue University in 1983.

 

Atefeh (Atti) Riazi

 

Atefeh (Atti) Riazi

Senior Partner and Chief Information Officer, Ogilvy and Mather Worldwide

The CIO of Ogilvy & Mather Worldwide, Atefeh (Atti) Riazi oversees the systems and network supporting one of the world's leading marketing communications agencies. Under her leadership, Ogilvy has consistently been cited by Information Week as possessing one of the most innovative IT functions nationwide. Ogilvy and Mather's client list includes a roster of blue chip brands that include; American Express, BP, DuPont, Ford, SAP, Cisco, IBM, Kodak, Kraft, Motorola and many others.

Atti has over 25 years of experience managing large organizations, private and public, in the manufacturing, engineering, transportation, and advertising sectors. Most recently, as the CIO of MTA New York City Transit, she implemented its $1.5B MetroCard automatic fare system.

A frequent author and speaker, Atti serves on the Board of major financial and marketing organizations.

 

Ronald L. Rivest

 

Ronald L. Rivest

Professor of Computer Science, MIT

Ron Rivest is a member of MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and a leader of its Cryptography and Information Security Group. He coinvented the RSA public-key cryptosystem and cofounded RSA Data Security and VeriSign. He is on the advisory board for the Electronic Privacy Information Center and has served on the U.S. Technical Guidelines Development Committee, which recently proposed standards for certifying voting system in the United States. He has also received, together with Adi Shamir and Leonard Adleman, the 2002 ACM Turing Award. He received a BA in mathematics from Yale University and a PhD in computer science from Stanford University.

 

Mendel Rosenblum

 

Mendel Rosenblum

Chief Scientist and Cofounder, VMware 

Mendel Rosenblum cofounded VMware with four others in 1998. There, he helped design and build the industry-leading virtualization technology for commodity computing platforms; he is now the chief scientist for VMware and also an associate professor in the departments of computer science and electrical engineering at Stanford, where he is director of the Computer Systems Laboratory and leads a group focused on operating-systems research. Rosenblum is a recipient of the 2002 ACM/SIGOPS Mark Weiser Award for creativity and innovation in operating systems research. He received a BA in math from the University of Virginia and a MS and PhD in computer science from the University of California, Berkeley.

 

Robert Scoble

 

Robert Scoble

Managing Director, FastCompany.TV

Active in online communities since the 1980s, Robert Scoble now runs FastCompany.TV, a new online video network aimed at bringing the best technology and business innovators and ideas to you while building new kinds of social networks using Twitter, FriendFeed, Upcoming.org, blogs, Flickr, YouTube, Seesmic, Qik, and other technologies. He's worked for big companies—NEC and Microsoft—as well as small startups. Along with Shel Israel , he wrote a book about corporate blogging, Naked Conversations.

 

Peter Semmelhack

 

Peter Semmelhack

Founder and CEO, Bug Labs

Peter Semmelhack is the founder and CEO of Bug Labs, which develops BUG, an open and modular electronics and Web services platform. Previously, he was founder and CEO of Antenna Software, a leading mobile enterprise software provider. Hailing from a background of nearly two decades in software, Semmelhack founded Bug Labs out of a personal passion. He envisions a future in which building consumer electronics devices will be just as easy as using them.

 

Joseph Smarr

 

Joseph Smarr

Chief Platform Architect, Plaxo

Joseph Smarr leads Plaxo's “Open Social Web” initiative, which uses open data-sharing standards to put users back in control of who they know when using socially enabled sites. An active participant in the Web 2.0 community, Joseph has built Web applications, including Plaxo's online address book and Web widgets, for many years. He was architect and lead developer of the Plaxo 3.0 rich AJAX address book, calendar, and sync tool.

Smarr has a BS and MS in artificial intelligence from Stanford University.

 

Adam Smith

 

Adam Smith

CTO, Xobni

Adam Smith founded Xobni in his dorm room in 2006. The application, which helps people manage the information in their e-mail, has received broad critical acclaim; Bill Gates demonstrated it at a major conference, and it has been covered in the New York Times. Smith began his entrepreneurial career by starting a software company at age 13; he initially accepted $5 checks in the mail. Before starting Xobni, he worked as a consultant to Siteadvisor before and after its acquisition by McAfee.

 

Marc Snir

 

Marc Snir

Director, Illinois Informatics Institute at the University of Illinois

Professor Marc Snir is director of the Illinois Informatics Institute at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is PI for the software of the petascale Blue Waters system and codirector of the Intel- and Microsoft-funded Universal Parallel Computing Research Center (UPCRC). Previously, he spent 15 years at IBM Research, where he led the research on scalable parallel software. He has written more than 100 papers on theoretical and applied aspects of parallel computing. He is an AAAS Fellow, ACM Fellow, and IEEE Fellow.

Snir received a PhD in mathematics from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 1979.

 

Holly Heaslet Soutter

 

Holly Heaslet Soutter

Principal Scientist, Lead Discovery Technologies, Pfizer Global Research and Development

Holly Soutter uses structure-based drug design techniques to enable rapid development of lead compounds in multiple therapeutic areas, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Before joining Pfizer, she was a senior postdoctoral fellow at the Scripps Research Institute, where she investigated drug resistance mechanisms in HIV protease, structural characteristics of nanodisc particles, and bacterial membrane proteins. She is also president of the Connecticut chapter of the Association for Women in Science. Soutter received a PhD in chemistry from Clark University in 2000.

 

Nova Spivack

 

Nova Spivack

Founder and CEO, Radar Networks

Nova Spivack is one of the leading voices of the emerging Semantic Web—what is sometimes referred to as Web 3.0. He founded Radar Networks to develop Twine, the next evolution of social software.

Spivack, who cofounded EarthWeb in 1994, has worked at Individual, Xerox/Kurzweil, and Thinking Machines, and also with SRI International on the DARPA CALO program and nVention. He founded Lucid Ventures and cofounded the San Francisco Web Innovators Network.
 
As a grandson of management guru Peter F. Drucker, Spivack shares his grandfather’s interest in the evolution of knowledge work. In 1999 he flew to the edge of space with Space Adventures.

 

Vladimir Stojanovic

 

Vladimir Stojanovic

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, MIT

Vladimir Stojanovic’s research interests include design, modeling, and optimization of integrated circuits and systems, from standard VLSI blocks to CMOS-based electrical and optical interfaces. Stojanovic received his PhD in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 2005. He received an MS in electrical engineering from Stanford in 2000 and a diplom-ingenieur degree from the University of Belgrade, Serbia, in 1998. He worked with Rambus in Los Altos, CA, from 2001 through 2004.

 

Lisa T. Su

 

Lisa T. Su

Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, Freescale Semiconductor

At Freescale Semiconductor, the global leader in embedded processing solutions, Lisa Su is responsible for technology roadmap and global R&D operations. She joined Freescale in June 2007 from IBM, where she was vice president of the Semiconductor Research and Development Center and was responsible for the strategic direction of silicon technologies, joint development alliances, and semiconductor R&D operations.

Su received bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

 

Sophie V. Vandebroek

 

Sophie V. Vandebroek

Chief Technology Officer, Xerox; President, Xerox Innovation Group

Dr. Sophie Vandebroek is responsible for overseeing Xerox’s research and technology centers around the world.

Previously Xerox’s chief engineer and vice president of the Xerox Engineering Center, she has also served as chief technology officer at Carrier. From 1991 to 2000,she held a number of increasingly responsible roles at Xerox, including director of the Xerox Research Centre of Canada.

Vandebroek was born in Leuven, Belgium. She earned a master’s degree in electromechanical engineering from Katholieke Universiteit in Leuven and a PhD in electrical engineering from Cornell University. She is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

 

Werner Vogels

 

Werner Vogels

Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, Amazon.com

Dr. Werner Vogels is vice president and chief technology officer at Amazon.com, where he is responsible for driving the company's technology vision: to continuously enhance innovation on behalf of Amazon's customers at a global scale.

Before joining Amazon, he worked as a scientist at Cornell University, where he was a principal investigator in several research projects that target the scalability and robustness of mission-critical enterprise computing systems. He has held positions as VP of technology and CTO in companies that handled the transition of academic technology into industry.

Vogels holds a PhD from the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam and has authored many articles for journals and conferences, most of them on distributed systems technologies for enterprise computing.

 

Eric von Hippel

 

Eric von Hippel

Professor of Management and Professor of Engineering Systems, MIT

Eric von Hippel, the T. Wilson Professor of Management and Professor of Engineering Systems at MIT, is known for his research into open and distributed innovation. He finds that product development is rapidly shifting away from product manufacturers to product “lead users” in the Internet age. The rapid growth of user-centered innovation requires major changes in company business models and government policymaking. Von Hippel’s 2005 book Democratizing Innovation explains user-centered innovation and describes how companies can adapt and profit. This book is available free on the Web at mit.edu/evhippel/www/books.htm.

 

Telle Whitney

 

Telle Whitney

President and CEO, Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology

Telle Whitney has 20 years of experience in the semiconductor and telecommunications industries and has a longstanding commitment to increasing the presence and impact of women in the technology field.

In 1994, Whitney cofounded the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing (GHC) conference along with Anita Borg. Today, the GHC conference is one of the institute’s flagship events and the world’s largest technical gathering for women. A cofounder of the National Center for Women and Information Technology, Whitney received her PhD from Caltech and her BS from the University of Utah, both in computer science.

 

Eric Wilhelm

 

Eric Wilhelm

Founder and CEO, Instructables

Eric Wilhelm earned his SB, SM, and PhD degrees in mechanical engineering from MIT, where he developed methods for printing electronics and microelectromechanical systems using nanoparticles; he was awarded the Collegiate Inventors Award. Wilhelm is the founder and CEO of the project-sharing website Instructables.com, a founding partner in Squid Labs, and a cofounder and advisor of several companies focused on wind energy, distributed human power, and optical lens molding. He strives to make technology accessible through understanding, and to inspire others to learn and share with those around them.

 

Holly Yanco

 

Holly Yanco

Associate Professor of Computer Science, University of Massachusetts, Lowell

Holly Yanco heads the Robotics Lab at UMass Lowell. Her research interests include human-robot interaction, sliding-scale autonomy, sensor fusion and presentation, interface design, and situation awareness in the domains of assistive technology and urban search and rescue. She has a PhD and MS from MIT and a BA from Wellesley College, all in computer science. Yanco is a member of the Executive Council of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI). She has received teaching awards from MIT and UMass Lowell.

 

Ronggui Yang

Ronggui Yang

Assistant Professor, University of Colorado, Boulder

Ronggui Yang has been an assistant professor of mechanical engineering, directing the Nanoscale and Ultrafast Thermal Sciences and Applications Lab (NUTS) at the University of Colorado at Boulder, since he completed his PhD at MIT in December 2005. Yang has a passion for manufacturable nanotechnology that could help solve challenging global energy and thermal management problems. His transformative research has won him numerous awards, including the 2008 DARPA Young Faculty Award, the 2005 Goldsmid Award from the International Thermoelectrics Society, and a NASA Certificate of Innovation in 2004. He is a member of Technology Review’s 2008 TR35.