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Now Available: Innovators Under 35 2014 See The 2014 List »

35 Innovators Under 35

Some members of our latest list of young innovators from around the world have developed consumer Web services you might have used, such as Spotify or Dropbox. Others are making more fundamental breakthroughs that have yet to be commercialized, such as more efficient engines or improvements in optical communications. And a few are blazing trails in fields that didn’t exist before, like pop-up fabrication of tiny machines, or cameras that can see around corners. But all 35 of them have something significant in common: their work is likely to be influential for a very long time. We hope that these stories about them surprise and inspire you. —The Editors

2012 TR35 Winners

Ryan Bailey

Shining a light on faster, cheaper, more accurate medical tests

Sarbajit Banerjee (video)

Windows that block heat—but let it through when you want them to

Burcin Becerik-Gerber (video)

Using cell phones to negotiate energy-efficient settings in office buildings

Qixin Chen (video)

Improving demand forecasting for electric power to save fuel and reduce emissions

William Chueh (video)

Pulling hydrogen out of water with the help of concentrated sunlight and an inexpensive material

Mircea Dincă

Using sponges to improve and store alternative fuels

Daniel Ek

Making online music a paying business, without forcing people to pony up for one song at a time

Rana el Kaliouby

Teaching devices to tell a frown from a smile

Ken Endo (video)

Adding spring to robotic limbs by doing away with some of the motors

Christina Fan (video)

Prenatal testing for genetic conditions from a sample of the mother’s blood

Abraham Flaxman (video)

Combining different types of data in new ways in order to track and slow the spread of disease in developing countries

Danielle Fong (video)

Making clean energy pay off by storing it as squeezed air

Saikat Guha (video)

Letting advertisers send targeted pitches to your mobile phone without ever seeing your personal information

Chris Harrison (video)

Liberating us from the touch screen by turning skin and objects into input devices

John Hering

Securing our smartphones from spyware and rogue apps, with a little help from the crowds

Drew Houston

Hiding all the complexities of remote file storage behind a small blue box

Prashant Jain

Tuning nanocrystals to make tinier, more efficient switches for optical computing and solar panels

Bryan Laulicht (video)

Finding an adhesive that protects vulnerable skin

Nanshu Lu (video)

Soft, flexible electronics bond to skin and even organs for better health monitoring

Shishir Mehrotra (video)

Turning a Web video phenomenon into a profitable business by making ads optional

Shannon Miller

Making engines super-efficient by getting them to run at extremely high pressures

Ren Ng (video)

By tracking the direction of light, a camera takes pictures that can be refocused on different objects in a scene

Juan Sebastián Osorio (video)

Monitors specially designed for premature infants help detect breathing problems

Joyce Poon (video)

A tiny roller coaster for light could help keep data ­centers cool

Hossein Rahnama (video)

Mobile apps that tell you what you need to know before you have to ask

Ben Silbermann

A smartly designed social network for sharing images and interests

Christopher Soghoian (video)

On a tear against bad privacy practices online, he urges companies to change the way they operate—and sounds alarms if they don’t.

Pratheev Sreetharan (video)

Mass-producible tiny machines snap into place like objects in a pop-up book

Leila Takayama (video)

Applying the tools of social science to make robots easier to live and work with

Bozhi Tian (video)

Artificial tissue that can monitor and improve health down to the level of individual cells

Eben Upton

His ultracheap computer is perfect for tinkering

Andreas Velten (video)

Spotting tiny problems with help from an ultrafast camera

Zheng Wang (video)

Slowing light to help chips cope with optical data

Baile Zhang

A new type of invisibility cloak made from a common material can work with larger objects

Weian Zhao (video)

Spying on cells in their native habitat to develop better tests and drugs

More Innovators Under 35

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